Posted 6 days ago
Hey, you always have amazing pictures of algae. What kind of string algae grows really quickly?
pepperofthenickel asked

Spirogyra is a fast grower, and is pretty hardy. 

Bonus pics:

Posted 1 week ago

Most of us picture bacteria as green, but this glob of bacteria I found in pond water is slightly pink. 

On the other hand, viruses have no color since they are smaller than wavelengths of light! Unless you are megavirus 

Posted 2 weeks ago

revereche:

merismo:

Microworld- pond water under a microscope featuring paramecia, euglena, and other protists

Filmed by merismo

hooooly shit that’s gorgeous

you can see them so much more distinctly, why don’t I see more microphotography like this?

Aww, thanks! 

Basically though the equipment required for dark-field microscopy is usually pretty expensive. I get around it by using a flashlight as a light source and shining it at just the right angle. It’s difficult to get it just right, especially while simultaneously filming the protist and adjusting various knobs to keep it in view and/or in focus. I’ll try uploading more videos and pictures like this, though! 

Posted 2 weeks ago
Awesome blog!!
raddikull asked

Thank you!!! 

Posted 2 weeks ago

I found this freshwater mite crawling around on a clump of cyanobacteria. 

Posted 1 month ago

Caterpillar guts under the microscope. 

If I knew more about insect anatomy I’d probably write some stuff out. But in this case I’ll just leave you with the pictures.

Posted 1 month ago

Ok so this post has been making rounds on tumblr- its already got over 70,000 notes. But it’s not entirely accurate, and you really shouldn’t get your news from the twitter accounts of reality star contestants. Anyways, here’s what happened: 

A baby was born with HIV that was passed down from pregnancy. The doctors gave the baby high doses of anti-retroviral drugs. These were the same drugs that are given to adults with HIV in order to keep the virus in check. In the baby’s case, it prevented the virus from establishing itself and lowered the viral count to clinically insignificant levels. Chances are there are still viruses floating around in the bloodstream, but the levels are too low to be of any danger. 

It should be noted that this really isn’t too revolutionary. The doctors used typical anti-retroviral drugs, which adults use all the time and are not cured as a result. Also, this method of “curing” babies born with HIV has not been widely tested, so it is possible that the few results are simply flukes, or are not even reliable enough to be significant. 

More importantly, having access to pre-natal care (specifically anti-retroviral therapy) can prevent HIV from being passed down onto infants during pregnancy. Prevention is better than curing, after all. 

Long story short- it’s not really a cure. 

(Source: itstonybetch)

Posted 1 month ago

These two protists are euglena, which are part photosynthetic part heterotrophic organisms. This means they both absorb sunlight to convert it to energy and occasionally ingest other organisms. The red eye-spot is used to detect light, which euglena are attracted to. 

Euglena are very diverse in shape, size, and color, as can be seen from my other photos and videos of this microorganism

Posted 1 month ago
micromademacro:

merismo:

A diatom colony. Sometimes getting an entire subject in focus is difficult with a microscope. But that’s what gifs are for. 
If you’ve been following my blog for a while, you probably already know what a diatom is. But for my new followers, a diatom is a type of microscopic algae made up of two silica shells that fit like a shoebox. They are found in nearly every aquatic or moist environment, from the open ocean to the garden in your backyard. Given their ubiquity, its no surprise that these algae are responsible for large portion of the oxygen we breathe, although estimates vary. 

Awesome! I worked with fossil diatoms and I was never lucky enough to find a colony so seeing something like this makes my heart go squee! Was the species of the diatoms making up the colony identified at all?

Although I can’t tell what species it is, I’m pretty certain the genus is Synedra! Most of the Synedra I find are solitary but it turns out they can be colonial, too. 

micromademacro:

merismo:

A diatom colony. Sometimes getting an entire subject in focus is difficult with a microscope. But that’s what gifs are for. 

If you’ve been following my blog for a while, you probably already know what a diatom is. But for my new followers, a diatom is a type of microscopic algae made up of two silica shells that fit like a shoebox. They are found in nearly every aquatic or moist environment, from the open ocean to the garden in your backyard. Given their ubiquity, its no surprise that these algae are responsible for large portion of the oxygen we breathe, although estimates vary. 

Awesome! I worked with fossil diatoms and I was never lucky enough to find a colony so seeing something like this makes my heart go squee! Was the species of the diatoms making up the colony identified at all?

Although I can’t tell what species it is, I’m pretty certain the genus is Synedra! Most of the Synedra I find are solitary but it turns out they can be colonial, too. 

Posted 1 month ago
I love your blog! :)
pickledpennies asked

Thanks pickledpennies! :)